LATN: Latin

Winter 2022

LATN101 Beginning Latin I Sections

Classical Latin, Part I.

Instructor(s): O'Hogan, Cillian Gorrie, Charmaine Reid, Shelley RAE, ANDREA LYN
Latin 101 Latin was the language of the Romans and, at the height of the Roman Empire during the first three centuries of the common era, was spoken throughout the whole of Western Europe and a large part of North Africa. After the fall of the Roman Empire in the west in the fifth century, Latin continued to be spoken in a variety of local dialects that developed through time into the modern Romance languages, e.g., French, Italian, and Spanish. Latin itself survived as the common language of educated people in Europe through the church and universities until the eighteenth century. A knowledge of Latin is essential to the study of the history, literature and archaeology of the Romans and for a serious understanding of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Europe. It is also extremely useful in the study of the Romance languages as well as the English language, which...
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LATN102 Beginning Latin II Sections

Classical Latin, Part II.

Instructor(s): MINARD, MARK ANTONE Gorrie, Charmaine Reid, Shelley
Latin 102 continues with the basics of Latin grammar that we began in Latin 101, and illustrates these by a series of readings adapted from the major authors of classical Latin literature.  Students will be reading passages from such famous authors and works as Julius Caesar’s memoir of his campaigns in Gaul, Pliny the Younger’s first-hand account of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, and the statesman Cicero’s letters to his family.   Text (required): Susan C. Shelmerdine, Introduction to Latin, 2nd ed., Focus Publishing, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-58510-390-4
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LATN201 Intermediate Latin I Sections

Completion of the grammatical foundations of classical Latin, Part I.

Instructor(s): Gorrie, Charmaine RAE, ANDREA LYN
Latin 201 completes most of the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax that were begun in Latin 101 and 102, which it illustrates by a series of readings adapted from the major authors of classical Latin literature.  We shall be reading passages from such famous authors and works as Livy’s legends of early Rome, Julius Caesar’s account of his campaigns in Gaul, and Tacitus’ story of the emperor Nero’s murder of the son of Claudius.   Text: Susan C. Shelmerdine, Introduction to Latin, 2nd ed., Focus Publishing, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-58510-390-4 (required)
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LATN202 Intermediate Latin II Sections

Completion of the grammatical foundations of classical Latin, Part II; an introduction to the reading of unadapted passages of Latin literature and discussion of thier cultural contexts.

Instructor(s): Gorrie, Charmaine RAE, ANDREA LYN
Latin 202 completes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax, which it illustrates by a series of readings slightly adapted from the major authors of classical Latin literature.  These include passages from such famous authors and works as Cicero on dreams, the historian Sallust on the decline of Rome, and the poet Ovid’s telling of the myth of Daedalus and Icarus. We then introduce students to the reading and translation of unadapted Latin, this year using as sample the third book of Eutropius’ Ab Urbe Condita, his summary of the events of Second Punic War. (Text of Eutropius is supplied.)   Required Text: Susan C. Shelmerdine, Introduction to Latin, 2nd ed., Focus Publishing, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-      58510-390-4
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LATN350 Latin Literature of the Classical Period (Prose) Sections

Readings in Latin Prose.

Instructor(s): RAE, ANDREA LYN
Third-year Latin aims to enhance students’ skills in reading unadapted Latin and to introduce them to some of the great authors of classical Latin literature. Our prose author this year will be the historian Livy. We shall be translating a selection of famous passages from his Ab Urbe Condita, and also considering his purposes in writing, the nature of his history and the linguisitic and artistic features of his work. Among our passages will be his narration of the founding of Rome, his stories of some early Roman heroes, his account of the Second (Hannibalic) Punic War, and his description of the Bacchic ‘conspiracy’ of 186 BCE. Texts (required): 1. Mary Jaeger, A Livy Reader: Selections from Ab Urbe Condita; Bolchazy-Carducci pub., ISBN: 978-0865166806 2. G. L. Kittredge, James B Greenough, Benj. L. D'Ooge, A. A. Howard, J. H. Allen, Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar; Dover pub., ISBN: 9780486448060
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LATN351 Latin Literature of the Classical Period (Verse) Sections

Readings in Latin Verse.

Instructor(s): Gorrie, Charmaine
The goals of this course are to introduce students to Latin poetry and metre, and through the reading of the Latin text, to help students strengthen their grasp of grammar and syntax and improve their facility in translation. We will read and analyse Book II of Vergil’s Aeneid in which Aeneas recounts the fall of Troy to Dido. This book contains the famous story of the Trojan horse, the destruction of the city, and Aeneas’ eventually escape with his father and son. Epic battles, action and adventure abound.
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LATN401A Latin Prose - LATIN PROSE Sections

Studies in history, oratory and/or philosophy. May be repeated for up to 12 credits. It is recommended that the corequisite course be completed prior to LATN 401.

Reading and Writing Latin Prose Texts
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LATN402A Latin Verse - LATIN VERSE Sections

Studies in narrative verse, comedy, satire, elegiac and lyric poetry. May be repeated for up to 12 credits. It is recommended that the corequisite course be completed prior to LATN 402.

Horace's Odes. In the Odes, Horace perfected Latin lyric poetry, and produced a body of work that has had incalculable influence on later writers. The poems deal with a wide range of topics, including friendship, love and sex, politics, and philosophy. In this class we will read the first and third books of Horace's Odes in their entirety. We will place the poems in their social, literary, and historical context, looking in particular at the use Horace makes of Greek lyric models, his relationship with Augustus/Augustan ideology, and his philosophical ideals. We will also look at the reception of the Odes, both within antiquity and in more recent English literature. Throughout the course, special attention will be paid to Horace's language, metre, and style. Note: Students may take Latin 402 more than once, since the content varies each year.  
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